Tuesday, July 29, 2014

everyworldneedslove:

I may always reblog every gifset/imageset I see of this scene, if only to point out (over and over and over again) that Black Widow’s “very specific skillset” is not, actually, ass-kicking (as amazing as she is at that), because all the Avengers can kick ass to a pretty high degree. The Black Widow’s superpower (as it were) is emotional manipulation.

She is not interrogating this man not while tied to a chair. She is tied to a chair because that is exactly where she wants to be, because apparent vulnerability on her part is part of her interrogation. She uses the exact same trick on Loki later, when she leads him into gloating over having successfully pushed her buttons (and I have a theory that he did actually push her buttons, that she was genuinely distressed by the things he said to her because Loki is old enough and smart enough to know when someone is lying to him) and turns his gloating around on him, uses it to dig into the cracks of him, because that is what she does, and she can do it even when her target is expecting it. (Really, Loki knows that’s why she’s there. He was expecting to be physically tortured first, and for her to come be sympathetic later, if you recall, but Loki and Widow both know that wouldn’t work.)

And this is why she’s so unsettled by the Hulk. The Black Widow relies on emotional manipulation — and the Hulk, to the best of her knowledge, only has varying shades of a single emotion: anger. She doesn’t know how to manipulate a creature if it doesn’t have all the hooks to emotions like pride and lust and guilt and greed that she’s used to using.

(Source: daily-mcu)

Monday, July 28, 2014

Another audience member then brought up a second statistic about above the line female talent, claiming that of all the major comic book publishers today, in the last ten years female above the line talent has gone up, except at Marvel where it has gone down. The frustrated attendee went on to ask Axel what the everyday comic book reader could do to help convince Marvel to invest in more less-established female creative talent.

"Support books beyond the big selling ones," Axel responded, "We really have to fight hard to get a book like Black Widow even approved in the system. We count on your support!"

Axel then went on the defensive and added, “As for your previous point about us not lining up with the rest of the industry, I’m not sure I agree. I don’t want to get talking about statistics or what-have-you, but we’re sort of the big leagues. We play a certain game, and that game is telling superhero comics. We have financial imperatives that drive us. We run our business a certain way.”

Marvel editor-in-chief Axel Alonso responds to criticism over the publisher’s lack of female writers and artists during the Women in Marvel panel at Comic-Con. From here.

The line “we’re sort of the big leagues” is appalling on many levels, but the whole report is worth reading—and also massively at odds, tone-wise, from other reports from the panel. Somehow, I suspect this one may be slightly closer to the reality.

(via graemem)

bookriot:

Hello, MOCKINGJAY teaser trailer!

(Almost) all my feelings about this are about how amazing Natalie Dormer looks.

losertakesall:

kohenari:

It turns out that the fancy booze you like is actually not so fancy after all. Most of the “craft,” “handmade,” “artisan” whisky that people have been hyping all comes from the same gigantic distillery in Indiana.
A lot of my friends here in Nebraska will be particularly saddened to learn the following about their beloved, local-ish brand:

Templeton Rye … has built its successful brand on being a product of Templeton, Iowa. They tell an elaborate story about how their recipe was used by the owner’s family to make illicit whiskey in Iowa during Prohibition, and how that rye had become Al Capone’s favorite hooch. They publish a description of their “Production Process” so detailed it lists the temperature (124 degrees) at which the “rye grain is added to the mash tank.” They brag that they focus their “complete attention on executing each step of the distillation process.” And yet, for all this detail, the official “Production Process” somehow fails to mention that Templeton doesn’t actually do the distilling.
Dig around enough on the Templeton Rye website, and you’ll find acknowledgment that their whiskey is factory-made in Indiana. But clinging to the craft distiller fiction, Templeton does its best to maintain that, rather than taking MGP whiskey off the shelf, they are somehow instructing the manufacturer how to make the juice.

I don’t much care for rye. I’m a wheated bourbon guy through-and-through. But apparently I really don’t like mass-produced rye. It’s interesting to now learn that my lack of interest in Dickel, Bulleit, and even the much ballyhooed Templeton stems from the fact that they’re all basically the same product in different bottles. If I don’t like mass-produced rye, I’m not going to like it no matter how it’s packaged.
That said, the amount of nonsense that Templeton is tossing out there to convince people that they’re making their own hooch really leaves a bad taste in my mouth far beyond the ordinary bad taste of the rye.
HT: Kris Kanthak.

huh! whaddaya know. cc:
onelinewhiskey
THEY ARE SULLYING MY LAST NAME.
THOSE BASTARDS.

losertakesall:

kohenari:

It turns out that the fancy booze you like is actually not so fancy after all. Most of the “craft,” “handmade,” “artisan” whisky that people have been hyping all comes from the same gigantic distillery in Indiana.

A lot of my friends here in Nebraska will be particularly saddened to learn the following about their beloved, local-ish brand:

Templeton Rye … has built its successful brand on being a product of Templeton, Iowa. They tell an elaborate story about how their recipe was used by the owner’s family to make illicit whiskey in Iowa during Prohibition, and how that rye had become Al Capone’s favorite hooch. They publish a description of their “Production Process” so detailed it lists the temperature (124 degrees) at which the “rye grain is added to the mash tank.” They brag that they focus their “complete attention on executing each step of the distillation process.” And yet, for all this detail, the official “Production Process” somehow fails to mention that Templeton doesn’t actually do the distilling.

Dig around enough on the Templeton Rye website, and you’ll find acknowledgment that their whiskey is factory-made in Indiana. But clinging to the craft distiller fiction, Templeton does its best to maintain that, rather than taking MGP whiskey off the shelf, they are somehow instructing the manufacturer how to make the juice.

I don’t much care for rye. I’m a wheated bourbon guy through-and-through. But apparently I really don’t like mass-produced rye. It’s interesting to now learn that my lack of interest in Dickel, Bulleit, and even the much ballyhooed Templeton stems from the fact that they’re all basically the same product in different bottles. If I don’t like mass-produced rye, I’m not going to like it no matter how it’s packaged.

That said, the amount of nonsense that Templeton is tossing out there to convince people that they’re making their own hooch really leaves a bad taste in my mouth far beyond the ordinary bad taste of the rye.

HT: Kris Kanthak.

huh! whaddaya know. cc:
onelinewhiskey

THEY ARE SULLYING MY LAST NAME.

THOSE BASTARDS.

Thursday, July 24, 2014
annaverity:

Fly the plane, Maddie.

annaverity:

Fly the plane, Maddie.

(Source: millymcaulay)

Thursday, July 17, 2014
slaughterhouse90210:

“He’s lost something, some illusion I used to think was necessary to him. He’s come to realize he too is human. Or is this a performance, for my benefit, to show me he’s up-to-date? Maybe men shouldn’t have been told about their own humanity. It’s only made them uncomfortable. It’s only made them trickier, slier, more evasive, harder to read.”  ― Margaret Atwood, Cat’s Eye

slaughterhouse90210:

“He’s lost something, some illusion I used to think was necessary to him. He’s come to realize he too is human. Or is this a performance, for my benefit, to show me he’s up-to-date? Maybe men shouldn’t have been told about their own humanity. It’s only made them uncomfortable. It’s only made them trickier, slier, more evasive, harder to read.”
― Margaret Atwood,
Cat’s Eye

Monday, July 14, 2014
Ok, yes, I painted my nails to match my reading material. It’s as good a way to make decisions as any.

Ok, yes, I painted my nails to match my reading material. It’s as good a way to make decisions as any.

Wednesday, July 9, 2014
is it ok if i just tag this “porn”

is it ok if i just tag this “porn”

(Source: whatsgabycooking.com)

screwing dudes, making bad choices

  • me: i just want to be home reading GoT bk4
  • which has ALL THE LADIES
  • all! the! ladies!
  • Molly: true! you get lotsa lady viewpoints in that one
  • me: poor cersei tho
  • she is losing her shit
  • Molly: yeah and i found martin's writing of her sort of ... i don't know
  • problematic in hard to define ways
  • like she wasn't a total effing moron in the first couple books and then she just gets sort of stupid in a way i don't totally buy
  • can't wait to see lena headey kill that stuff though
  • me: yeah she's unraveling pretty hard
  • and it seems to be directly tied to her getting actual power
  • which is a shitty thing to do to a character
  • "oh look women can't really handle true power"
  • Molly: i suspect there is an argument that her getting power is tied to all her men dying but STILL
  • and i don't mean that it's all men but basically her family is an utter disaster
  • but all the sex stuff.... he ties that together in a way i find ugh in her story and dany's
  • "you got power! now screw some dudes and make bad choices!"
  • story of GoT
  • screwing and bad choices
Monday, July 7, 2014
summerscourtney:

sarahmccarry is the author of the critically acclaimed YA novels, ALL OUR PRETTY SONGS (which was the inaugural Headcrab Recs YA pick) and its forthcoming sequel (out July 15th, 2014), DIRTY WINGS. Kirkus has called her work, “Haunting, otherworldly and heartbreaking,” and “breathtaking” and believe me THEY ARE RIGHT.  Sarah’s work pulls no punches. None. You want to talk about complex, visceral, amazing female protagonists and the kind of stories that haunt your dreams because they’re so fucking good? Look no further. To read more about her books, visit her website.
To celebrate the upcoming release of DIRTY WINGS (and YES THIS INVOLVES A GIVEAWAY, details after the interview), Sarah agreed to sit down and answer an aggressive set of questions.
Why do your books have GIRLS in them.  Please tell me what kind of thought process was behind that decision. Was this to add to the magical realism? We all know stories about girls aren’t “real.”
SARAH: I know! It’s so embarrassing. It’s like every time I sit down to write, I’m all like, “No, THIS time, I’m going to write a REAL story about BOYS doing BOYS’ THINGS.” Finding themselves and crushing out on girls and being straight and manly and stuff. Like an emotional (but obviously not TOO emotional) journey of self-discovery and coming of age with poignant moments of bittersweet, wrenching humor and maybe cancer—you know, something really universal and relatable that brings Americans together around our shared common values. But when I start writing, I get possessed by these overwhelming urges to write about experiences that are actually interesting to me, and I do that instead! It’s a terrible problem to have.
Aurora inspires a lot of devotion to the unnamed narrator of ALL OUR PRETTY SONGS but Aurora can be selfish. Let’s talk about that. Don’t you think you should have made her (and all of your characters, but especially the girls) more LIKABLE?
Courtney, I’m telling you, these girls started out super nice. They never made bad decisions, they wore clean dresses and brushed their hair, they used their inside voices. And then while I was working on this book, the WORST IMAGINABLE thing happened—it was like this inner voice was shouting at me, “Sarah, make your characters PEOPLE! Make them SEEM LIKE PEOPLE!” That was when everything went to shit.
There are drugs and also there is cursing in your work. Doesn’t seem to me you were thinking of the children. Why weren’t you thinking of the children?
I meant to think of the children! I’m easily distracted. Sorry, what were you saying?
The MPAA would probably rate your books R. What do you have to say for yourself?
I know!!! It’s terrible!!! Just think what they would rate my life. I would totally just die!!!!!!
Your writing style is gritty and unflinching. But isn’t life gritty and unflinching ENOUGH? Why not make your work a kinder, gentler experience for readers?
I was trying to make my books more like Game of Thrones. I’m told that helps sales.
Your work has been described as edgy and sharp, which sounds unsafe for readers. If someone were to read your work in spite of this warning, please list some of its potential emotional side effects.
TOTAL DEVASTATION. I have also been told it inspires people to slouch, dress in a slovenly manner, and listen to loud music, so consider yourselves warned. Dirty Wings may also cause you to, in no particular order: defy your parents, quit your job, run away from home, start a rock band, kiss girls, and do a lot of speed. I mean, hopefully not, but I would want readers to be prepared.
ALL OUR PRETTY SONGS was endorsed by a headcrab. That’s disgraceful. That’s not a question, I just wanted you to know.
I guess it could have been a louse.
!!!!!! 
You guys, I adore this woman and I adore her work and I want you to have it. That means…
GIVEAWAY! This giveaway is open to US & CAN only (sorry!). I am giving away TWO SETS of ALL OUR PRETTY SONGS and DIRTY WINGS to TWO WINNERS. To enter, all you have to do is:
1) Like or reblog this interview or2) Retweet my tweet (https://twitter.com/courtney_s/status/485207053183758336) of this interview!
Super easy, RIGHT? Liking and reblogging = 2 entries (1 each), tweeting = 1, so you can enter up to 3 times total! Winners will be randomly drawn and contacted on July 15th, and have their prizes shipped out to them immediately!

Reblogging wholeheartedly because the words at the top are totally true.

summerscourtney:

sarahmccarry is the author of the critically acclaimed YA novels, ALL OUR PRETTY SONGS (which was the inaugural Headcrab Recs YA pick) and its forthcoming sequel (out July 15th, 2014), DIRTY WINGS. Kirkus has called her work, “Haunting, otherworldly and heartbreaking,” and “breathtaking” and believe me THEY ARE RIGHT.  Sarah’s work pulls no punches. None. You want to talk about complex, visceral, amazing female protagonists and the kind of stories that haunt your dreams because they’re so fucking good? Look no further. To read more about her books, visit her website.

To celebrate the upcoming release of DIRTY WINGS (and YES THIS INVOLVES A GIVEAWAY, details after the interview), Sarah agreed to sit down and answer an aggressive set of questions.

Why do your books have GIRLS in them.  Please tell me what kind of thought process was behind that decision. Was this to add to the magical realism? We all know stories about girls aren’t “real.”

SARAH: I know! It’s so embarrassing. It’s like every time I sit down to write, I’m all like, “No, THIS time, I’m going to write a REAL story about BOYS doing BOYS’ THINGS.” Finding themselves and crushing out on girls and being straight and manly and stuff. Like an emotional (but obviously not TOO emotional) journey of self-discovery and coming of age with poignant moments of bittersweet, wrenching humor and maybe cancer—you know, something really universal and relatable that brings Americans together around our shared common values. But when I start writing, I get possessed by these overwhelming urges to write about experiences that are actually interesting to me, and I do that instead! It’s a terrible problem to have.

Aurora inspires a lot of devotion to the unnamed narrator of ALL OUR PRETTY SONGS but Aurora can be selfish. Let’s talk about that. Don’t you think you should have made her (and all of your characters, but especially the girls) more LIKABLE?

Courtney, I’m telling you, these girls started out super nice. They never made bad decisions, they wore clean dresses and brushed their hair, they used their inside voices. And then while I was working on this book, the WORST IMAGINABLE thing happened—it was like this inner voice was shouting at me, “Sarah, make your characters PEOPLE! Make them SEEM LIKE PEOPLE!” That was when everything went to shit.

There are drugs and also there is cursing in your work. Doesn’t seem to me you were thinking of the children. Why weren’t you thinking of the children?

I meant to think of the children! I’m easily distracted. Sorry, what were you saying?

The MPAA would probably rate your books R. What do you have to say for yourself?

I know!!! It’s terrible!!! Just think what they would rate my life. I would totally just die!!!!!!

Your writing style is gritty and unflinching. But isn’t life gritty and unflinching ENOUGH? Why not make your work a kinder, gentler experience for readers?

I was trying to make my books more like Game of Thrones. I’m told that helps sales.

Your work has been described as edgy and sharp, which sounds unsafe for readers. If someone were to read your work in spite of this warning, please list some of its potential emotional side effects.

TOTAL DEVASTATION. I have also been told it inspires people to slouch, dress in a slovenly manner, and listen to loud music, so consider yourselves warned. Dirty Wings may also cause you to, in no particular order: defy your parents, quit your job, run away from home, start a rock band, kiss girls, and do a lot of speed. I mean, hopefully not, but I would want readers to be prepared.

ALL OUR PRETTY SONGS was endorsed by a headcrab. That’s disgraceful. That’s not a question, I just wanted you to know.

I guess it could have been a louse.

!!!!!!

You guys, I adore this woman and I adore her work and I want you to have it. That means…

GIVEAWAY! This giveaway is open to US & CAN only (sorry!). I am giving away TWO SETS of ALL OUR PRETTY SONGS and DIRTY WINGS to TWO WINNERS. To enter, all you have to do is:

1) Like or reblog this interview or
2) Retweet my tweet (https://twitter.com/courtney_s/status/485207053183758336) of this interview!

Super easy, RIGHT? Liking and reblogging = 2 entries (1 each), tweeting = 1, so you can enter up to 3 times total! Winners will be randomly drawn and contacted on July 15th, and have their prizes shipped out to them immediately!

Reblogging wholeheartedly because the words at the top are totally true.